SHITS : Surgo’s Highly Interesting Toilet Study | Surgo

SHITS

Surgo's Highly Interesting Toilet Study

Daniel Taylor-Sweet 1

1University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland

March 2015

Funding: No funding was received or applied for.

Conflicting Interests: None.

Ethical Approval: Applied for ethical approval from ‘MedChir Ethics Committee’, pending approval.

 

An analysis of the most commonly occurring celebrity diets on Google.

Background

One in five Britons will have commenced a new diet at the start of the year, in a vain attempt to shed pounds and help sculpt a perfect beach bod. Many of these people attempt a ‘celebrity diet’ that they have read about in the high impact nutritional journal ‘Cosmo’. SHITS is less concerned with the effect of the diet or the amount of weight they lose but far more interested in how the diets affect their poop. We aim to assess the effect of commencing a ‘celebrity diet’ on poop quality and quantity. No study has investigated this area before. Prior to commencing investigation into the diets effect on poop we aim to determine the most commonly occurring ‘celebrity diets’ online.

Methods

SHITS will comprise of two parts; Part 1: diet selection and Part 2: diet’s effect on poop.

Part 1 will include an initial Google search will be completed to find popular ‘celebrity diets’, which will be recorded.

A preliminary list of diets will be created for analysis. Any diet designed to be completed with an adjunctive exercise program will be excluded from further analysis as will any diet involving the consumption of dangerous or illegal substances.

Following application of exclusion criteria a subsequent Google search will be completed on the diets identified and the five diets returning the largest number of Google search results will be selected for study.

Results

Five diets were selected for study. The most popular diets were: ‘Gluten free diet’ [61,400,000 results], ‘Sugar free diet’ [51,200,000 results], ‘Raw food diet’ [32,200,000 results], ‘5:2 diet’ [20,000,000 results] and ‘Paleo diet’ [13,700,000 results].

Conclusion

The wide variety of ‘celebrity diets’ listed on the Internet shows a trend for diets to be based on removing certain food groups from ones diet.

Another trend can be seen in the rise of diets encouraging eating foods that are uncooked, ‘natural’ or ‘unprocessed’.

It is unclear on how the selected diets will affect the participants’ poop. SHITS: Part 2 will investigate this.